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Day: November 29, 2014

Since Eisenhower, Executive Action used for immigration

When President Barack Obama signed the executive action to make immigration reforms, he was following the lead of several other presidents. Every U.S. president since at least 1956 has granted temporary immigration relief of some form.

President Ronald Reagan and his successor George H.W. Bush extended amnesty to family members who were not covered by the last major overhaul of immigration law in 1986. Those two presidents have acted unilaterally on immigration and both were Republican. Neither faced the political uproar widely anticipated when President Barack Obama used his…

Poll find broad support for immigration Executive Action

A poll by Hart Research on behalf of Americans United for Change has found broad popular support among Democrats with 91 percent, Independents with 57 percent, and 41 percent of Republicans for President Obama’s executive orders on immigration.

The Hart Research poll found, voters respond favorably by an overwhelming 39-point margin to executive action by President Obama that would focus immigration enforcement efforts on threats to national security and public safety while allowing some undocumented immigrants to stay and work in the United States, 67 percent favorable, 28 percent…

Mexican Consulate welcomes the measures benefiting Mexicans in the US

As a result of the announcement made by the President of the United States, Barak Obama, on November 20 regarding administrative measures on migration, the Consulate of Mexico in Little Rock, Arkansas, held an informational event to publicize the position of the Mexican government towards the executive action announced by President Obama. “The Consulate of Mexico in Little Rock will monitor the implementation of this decision to report promptly to the Mexican community and continue to provide consular assistance and protection to all Mexicans, regardless of their immigration status,” said…

USCIS: Immigration agency awaits “a real challenge”

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is the first stop for people applying for a green card, citizenship or refugee status. The agency, part of the Department of Homeland Security, will be on the front line of President Obama’s executive action, which could give legal status to an estimated 4 million undocumented people.

Stephen Legomsky, chief counsel for USCIS in the first days of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, DACA, says that order was a “heavy lift” for the agency because it meant “training the adjudicators, hiring them, and finding physical space for them.” And…